Lifestyle

Millennial Parents and What We Can Learn From Them

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Millennials are often portrayed as these tech-savvy people perpetually tethered to their smart phones. They’re also often (unfairly) described as narcissistic and entitled, the kids who got trophies simply for showing up. So what happens when these kids become parents? Well, guess what, it’s already happening.

A new survey by the US Census reveal that millennials are taking over as parents. About one in five mothers is a millennial and, currently, 53% of millennial households have children.

As the largest generation in US history, millennials are expected to impact and influence various aspects of society from the economy to technology. There is a lot to be learned from millennials, from their unique traits to their infectious outlook.

Who are millennials?

Millennials are people born between the years 1980 to 2000. They grew up in a time of rapid change, unprecedented technological advancement and economic tension. They have traits and behaviors that set them apart from previous generations. Millennials are often described as true-blue multi-taskers, tech-savvy, digitally connected, adventurous and attracted to diverse environments. These qualities make them unique as parents as well.

In this article, we’ll take a look at some common millennial qualities and how we can incorporate them into parenting in the modern age.

Quick Millennial Parent Statistics*

  • Number of US households with adults 25-34 who have children: 10.8 million
  • Median income: $50,000
  • Total labor force participation rate: 76%
  • Labor force participation—women: 61%
  • Living in urban area: 28%
  • Living in suburban area: 51%
  • Living in rural area: 20%
  • Hispanic population: 16%
  • African American population: 12%
  • Caucasian population: 61%
  • Other minority population: 11%

*Source: millennialmarketing.com

4 Millennial Buying Habits

1. They use their gadgets to shop

Having grown up in the age of the internet, millennials rely much on digital technology for many everyday tasks like shopping. Not surprisingly, they use their gadgets like smartphones to shop. Many online retailers recognize the rise of smartphones so they have adopted mobile-friendly approaches for their websites.

Shopping online will save you considerable time especially during holiday sales season when malls are crowded.

2. They compare prices

Millennials are price-sensitive consumers who use the internet to compare prices and get the best shopping deals. According to a survey conducted by corporate rewards company Blackhawk Engagement Solutions, 46 percent of millennials prefer Amazon and 43 percent prefer Google when comparing prices of goods.

3. They use social media for product feedback

The social-media savvy millennial generation not only uses the internet to compare prices, they turn to it for feedback and reviews of products and businesses. A survey on Adweek shows that 93 percent of millennials use blogs and other online reviews before making a purchase and 77 percent trust the reviews they see on websites.

The same survey also said 93 percent of millennials bought products after hearing about it from a family or friend and 89 percent trusted these suggestions more than claims made by the brand.

4. They are willing to pay more for social-conscious brands

Millennials are often described as socially aware and politically active. Their engagement with the world around them extends to their brand preferences. According to millennialmarketing.com, 50 percent of millennial parents prefer products that support causes and charities. Not surprisingly, the top three brands that appeal to millennials (Nike, Apple and Target) all have an advocacy.

Shopping tricks from millennials:

Follow the millennial way of shopping. become a smarter shopper by:

  • Reading up reviews about brands and products before buying anything
  • Comparing different prices of goods online to get the best deals
  • Following your favorite brands on social media to get updates on special promos
  • Shopping online when pressed for time
  • Supporting brands that have a special cause or charity

6 Millennial Parenting Styles

Millennial Parents and What We Can Learn From Them | Baby Care Weekly

image via pexels.com

1. They consider their children’s diet as top priority

For millennials good health isn’t just about not getting sick. To them it means eating healthy and having exercise and this outlook is reflected on the way they raise kids. A survey on millennialmarketing.com found that 52 percent of millennial parents closely monitored their children’s diet. This might also explain why many millennial moms prefer small, niche brands that put a premium on health, honesty and other ethical values.

2. They believe in stay-at-home parenting

Today’s millennial parents want to be engaging to their children. A survey conducted by ypulse.com found that 57 percent of millennial moms and 21 percent of millennial dads stay at home to take care of their children. Another survey on millennialmarketing.com also reveal that 48 percent millennial parents believe that children do best if they are raised by a stay-at-home mom.

3. They let their children use gadgets and social media

Because they grew up in the digital age and the rise of social media, it comes as no surprise that millennial parents are more open to letting their children use digital gadgets and even use social media. A survey on ypulse.com found that 30 percent of millennial parents believed children between the ages of 0 to 3 years old may be allowed to play with smartphones. As for social media, 32 percent of millennial parents have created a social media profile for their children.

4. They avoid helicopter parenting

Millennials are more respectful of their children’s space, veering away from the so-called helicopter parenting invented by their Baby Boomer predecessors. A survey on ypulse.com found that majority (88 percent) of millennial parents are trying to avoid becoming helicopter parents.

Another survey on millennialmarketing.com revealed that 61 percent of millennial parents believed their children needed more unstructured playtime. For millennial parents, free play will empower children to become better problem-solvers.

5. Millennial moms want to fit different roles

Millennial moms face many new challenges and pressures in today’s fast-paced world. They find it necessary to fulfill the various roles set for them be it best friend, teacher or dietitian. According to a BabyCenter report, about 80 percent of moms claims it is important for them to be “the perfect mom” to their kids This is a higher percentage compared to mothers from both Generation X and Baby Boomer generation.

6. They consider social media important to their parenting

Parenting is certainly more competitive and demanding today than it was in previous generations. Fortunately many tools and technology are now available to help millennial parents juggle their multiple roles. A study by Crowdtap found that 97 percent of millennial moms and 93 percent of millennial dads consider social media helpful to their parenting. Millennial parents turn to social media and the internet to exchange information on a variety of topics from baby products to parenting advice.

Parenting lessons from millennials:

Follow the parenting styles of millennials by:

  • Reading and researching about the food you buy for your family
  • Being more hands-on and engaged as parents
  • Guiding your child’s use of social media and digital gadgets.
  • Respecting your child’s need for space
  • Encouraging free play and activities that promote creative problem solving
  • Using technology and social media to help you organize and create balance in your life

Millennials are certainly an empowered, socially compassionate and technologically adept bunch. Parents from different generations can learn a lot from their unique habits and traits but, like any generation, millennials also have negative qualities that need to be addressed. These traits include narcissism, a marked sense of entitlement and over-dependence on technology and social media.